Set reference date for senior days

Click here to read more about seniority days.

Click here to read more about employments.

What are senior days?

Senior days are extra leave days that can be entitled to employees based on the age of the employee.

The age is determined based on the number of years that are between the birth year and the year of entitlement. In the case of half years, for example for age 57.5, the age will be determined based on the date 6 months after your birthday (6 months after the month of birth, on the same day as your birthday). So, 27/6 will become 27/12 with senior days on the half year.

The different ages have follow each other directly and cannot overlap. For example:

  • 50 | 2; If the employee is 50 on the reference date, s/he will receive two extra days.
  • 55 | 4; If the employee is 55 on the reference date, s/he will receive four extra days. The previous two days for 50 and older will not be entitled to the employee anymore. (So the employee won’t receive 6 days!). Only in the case of pro rato, the 2 extra days for the age between 50 and 55 and 4 extra days for 55 and up) will be entitled, both in pro rato in the case of a person that turns 55 that year.  (2 days pro rato before the birthday, and 4 days pro rato after the birthday).

Reference date: (determines the age for either the full fiscal year, or only a part of it, or some other variation, as can be read below)

  • Start of year; The age of the employee is determined at the start of the fiscal year. For example, if the employee is 60 at the start of the fiscal year, then the employee will receive senior days for the age 60. If the employee turns 60 during the fiscal year, then the reference date will calculate 59 at the start of the fiscal year.
  • End of year; The age is determined at the end of the fiscal year. So if the employee turns 60 within this year, then the employee will receive the extra senior days at the beginning of the fiscal year already.
  • Date of birth (Pro-Rato); The date of birth counts as reference date. The part of the fiscal year before your birthday belongs to the earlier senior period, and the part after the birthday will belong to the later senior period. Each of these periods will be pro rato based on the birthday. For example: An employee has his birthday on 1/4 (first of April) and turns 60 (after a ‘quarter’ of the year). The first months (up till the birthday) will take the senior period of 55-60 (with 4 extra senior days), and from the birthday on, 60-65 (with 8 extra senior days) is used. This means that the employee receives 25% of the 5 senior days, and 75% of the 7 senior days.
  • Custom; The administrator can decide which date has to count as the reference date. This can be any day in the year. (say 1/7). So the age that an employee has at specifically that day, that age will count for the full year.
  • Custom-proportional; This reference date divides the year into two equal parts, on July first, and entitles employees to senior days according to the following division: the employees who have their birthday in the first part in the year (before 1/7) get the full amount of senior days allotted to their age. The employees who have their birthdays in the second part of the year (after 1/7) get half of the senior days allotted to their age. This is only relevant in the years that employees are at an age which is on the boundary of a new segment, such as 50, 55, or 60; after this year they will receive the full amount of senior days at the beginning of the year. For example: an employee turns 50 in September; s/he gets half of the total number of senior days allotted to the age of 50, because the birthday is in the second part of the year. The year after this, the employee will receive the full amount of senior days at the start of the year.

For the actual amount the employee is entitled to, the following things are always taken into account:

  • % Part-time; Should your employee work 32 hours a week, that would be a part-time percentage of 80. The total amount that will come out of the calculation (as speculated above) will be multiplied by 80%.
  • Only FTE; This option means that only those who work 100% (under full time employment) will receive senior days.
  • Start of employment date; When the start of employment date is within the current fiscal year, this date will be taken as the start of the period for entitlement, instead of the start date of the fiscal year (1/1).
  • End of employment date; When the end of employment date is within the current fiscal year, this date is used as the end of the period for entitlement, instead of the end date of the fiscal year (31/12).

The period of entitlement calculated down to exactly the right number of days between the start of the fiscal year, or start of employment, and the end of the fiscal year, or end of employment.

Set / Change reference date

The reference date for senior days does not have to be the same for the entire company. The date depends on the employment. In order to change the reference date, navigate to ‘Master data’ ⇒ ‘Employments‘. Select the little pencil next to the employment. Here you can select the reference date in the dropdown bar. The following options can be chosen: start of year, end of year, birthday, or custom.

If you choose “custom”, you have to enter the number of months after the start of the fiscal year in the field after “custom (months after start).

senior days

Click here to read more about seniority days.

Click here to read more about employments.